Meet the Polar Star crew – CWO2 Seth Endter

Chief Warrant Officer Seth Endter, the electronics officer aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, pauses for a photo in front of a bank of electrical switches, some of which date back to the 1970s, Jan. 26, 2017. Endter is responsible for overseeing the maintenance and management of all electrical and computer equipment aboard the cutter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer David Mosley.

Chief Warrant Officer Seth Endter, the electronics officer aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, pauses for a photo in front of a bank of electrical switches, some of which date back to the 1970s, Jan. 26, 2017. Endter is responsible for overseeing the maintenance and management of all electrical and computer equipment aboard the cutter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer David Mosley.

Chief Warrant Officer Seth Endter is deployed aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star as part of its mission to assist in the annual resupply of U.S. Antarctic Program research stations. The National Science Foundation manages the U.S. Antarctic Program.

BACKGROUND:
Name/rate/rank: CWO2 Seth Endter
Number of trips to Antarctica: one
Unit/department: Electronics Officer

Q. Where is your hometown?
A. My parents’ hometown is Alta Loma, CA

Q. How long have you been in the Coast Guard?
A. More than 18 years

Q. Why did you join the Coast Guard? Why do you stay/what keeps you motivated?
A. While attending college, I wanted to take a break and evaluate if I really wanted to pursue an academic career path. I wanted to do something different for awhile and the Coast Guard was the path I choose. It turned out that I really enjoy what I do for the service and decided to stay. I have a legacy of service in my family and that is a great motivation. Additionally, I have been fortunate to work with and for some great people and that camaraderie has been a huge benefit to me.

Q. What is your unit history?
A. Station Channel Island, Oxnard, CA; ET “A” School, Coast Guard Cutter Campbell, New Bedford, MA; LORAN Station Searchlight, NV; LORAN “C” School Instructor at Petaluma, CA; XPO at LORAN Station George, George, WA; commissioning crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, Alameda, CA; Facilities Engineer at Petaluma, CA; commissioned as a chief warrant officer and now assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star in Seattle.

Q. What are some of your responsibilities on the Polar Star?
A. I am responsible for the maintenance, material and the management of all ET, IT, control group and EM (electronics) maintenance and equipment. I’m also responsible for the shipboard electrical program and have other collateral duties.

Chief Warrant Officer Seth Endter, the electronics officer aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, analyzes two circuit boards as he replaces a board from 1981 that is no longer functional, Jan. 26, 2017. The crew of the Polar Star is constantly working with outdated equipment, often rebuilding original components, to ensure safe operations of the cutter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer David Mosley.

Chief Warrant Officer Seth Endter, the electronics officer aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, analyzes two circuit boards as he replaces a board from 1981 that is no longer functional, Jan. 26, 2017. The crew of the Polar Star is constantly working with outdated equipment, often rebuilding original components, to ensure safe operations of the cutter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer David Mosley.

Q. What do you do on a typical duty day?
A. There really is no typical day aboard. The day is filled with constant maintenance and repair of systems that have been around as long as I have been alive. In addition to the equipment, I have oversight of the IT, ET, EM and Control Group personnel aboard the cutter, so no two days are the same.

Q. What’s your most memorable experience on the Polar Star? Why?
A. The culmination of each crew member’s efforts to get the ship underway was truly remarkable. The crew coming together as one team to resolve deficiencies, which could have prevented the cutter from getting underway, was something I won’t soon forget.

Q. Why is this mission (Operation Deep Freeze) important? How do you/your crew contribute?
A. As scientists explore our global climate, it’s important to learn more about the past indicators of any potential impacts that could lead to greater understanding of future environmental impacts. The Polar Star’s efforts directly contribute to the success of the scientists’ missions by ensuring they have the support and means to continue their studies here.

Q. What do you do for fun when not on duty (on or off the ship)? Hobbies?
A. I enjoy riding dirt bikes, fishing, surfing, golfing, mountain biking, scuba diving and hanging out with friends and family. I am also big into home audio and theater gear, tinkering around with the different options and technologies and taking the time to understand each system’s capabilities.

Q. Anything else you’d like for us to know/include?
A. There is a phrase that always rings true to me. “Always yearn for greater…” This is something that can apply to personal growth in relation to professional accomplishments. In reality, the phrase can pertain to just about anything in life, including finances and relationships. Essentially, always strive to learn more and do more.

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